El implacable avance de los Robots

abril 4, 2017

Robots inteligentes ofrecen servicios de información a pasajeros en Estación de Ferrocarril Jinan Oeste

Imagen del 29 de diciembre de 2016 de una agente de seguridad pidiendo ayuda a un robot inteligente en la Estación de Ferrocarril Jinan Oeste, en Jinan, capital de la provincia de Shandong, en el este de China. Tres robots inteligentes ofrecieron servicios de información a los pasajeros en la estación del ferrocarril.
.

El mundo se prepara para cambiar de la atención personalizada humana a la atención a través de robots inteligentes.

¿Estamos preparados para el cambio?


Más información:

Fábrica china sustituye al 90% del personal con robots

En 2030 la mitad de los empleados en Japón serán robots

Los robots colaborativos llegan a las fábricas

¿Los robots nos dejarán sin trabajo?

Videos:

.

.

.

.

.

robot


Vincúlese a nuestras Redes Sociales:

Google+      LinkedIn      YouTube      Facebook      Twitter


Promocione su negocio con el marketing digital

.

.

Robots are rewriting John Keynes equation of employment

febrero 21, 2017

AI is rewriting John Keynes equation of employment

By Denis Sproten.

Back in 1930, Keynes predicted that the working week would be drastically cut, to perhaps 15 hours a week, with people choosing to have far more leisure as their material needs were satisfied. His prediction is slowly becoming true, but not because of satisfied material needs, but more due to automation and eventually AI and robots.

The famous equation about the rate of involuntary unemployment (see left one below) is driven by labor supply and rigid wages.

Supply and demand balance out and set wages, but if labor supply would rise (and demand fall) and wages stay rigid, this would increase involuntary unemployment.

Here are some of my own projections, the point being that salaries keep increasing just with inflation, but real wages have been flat since 1970.

 A short introduction, first there were the luddites, destroying machinery, which automated mundane tasks. People tell us, we should be happy that we don’t need to do these anymore. This is all history, from which we moved on:

  • Working the fields / weaving: Let’s assume that required a machine with IQ 80 or MIQ of 80, production increased and more products were sold on markets, consumption increased, transportation was needed and distribution of goods into shops. More roads were needed etc, we found a replacement occupation in the next layer.
  • Working as a driver / service industry : assume it requires a machine of IQ 100-110, more complex tasks, product knowledge, navigation, forms to be filled, start of knowledge industry. These jobs are being replaced now as we get automated trucks, drones delivering, online shops replacing shops on the street.
  • Working in an office Knowledge Industry : assume it requires an IQ of 100-120, even more complex tasks, which involve creation of new products, design, programming, lawyers, accountants, doctors etc. We are not there yet, but we soon will have AI which can do basic tasks of doctors, writing news articles, design thinking, algorithms which categorise knowledge and lets you search it.

donde quieras office estilo de vida internet

.

People are being pushed to become Data Scientists, AI programmers, math geniuses writing algorithms, all jobs which likely require an IQ of 130+. Programs can now write music and are starting to be creative.

The trend I see is that, yes we will be able to find new jobs, but they will require really highly intelligent people, which covers only a small percentage of the population, no matter how much education they have received. Maybe becoming cyborgs will be the answer, if we believe Elon Musk.

robot jetsonsSo automation does create new jobs but not as many as it destroys. Inevitably AI and computing will outsmart people and what work will there be left for people to do? One argument which speaks against that is that the more robots and AI we have the more goods they will produce and the cheaper they will become. We will be richer. But who is this «we» group? In the last economic conference at Davos it was announced that in 2010, 43 people were as rich as 50% of the poorest on this earth. In 2016, this has now gone down to 8 people! 8 people as rich as half the world combined.

This points to the inequality gap becoming bigger and bigger, and only those who own robots will earn an income.

The economic counter-argument is that it will balance itself out, robots will not produce goods which people cannot buy. Or have no money to buy, hence if people lose their jobs there will be less robots producing things. In my opinion, this may balance the economics formula, but not the rate of unemployment.

And so, robots will start producing the goods for people who do have the money, exactly how it is in the world right now. The West produces goods for the western world (at their income rate) and not for 3rd or 4th world countries, where there is very little income. This will increase the inequality even further, effectively raising the rate of unemployment, as less money is spent. Goods will be produced for the rich.

What will countries do to protect themselves? Raise taxes on robots? Factories will just move to a safe-haven country. For now the only savior I see is the IOT industry, which will create millions of jobs installing devices in all sorts of places which require maintenance and support. This will provide even more data to the rich and grow the knowledge industry. Knowledge after all is power!

Source: linkedin.com/pulse, Feb 16, 2017.

Más información:

Los nuevos Paradigmas del siglo XXI – Economía Personal

.

El Mundo está cambiando – Economía Personal

.

El Futuro del Trabajo en el Siglo XXI – Economía Personal

¡Descubra las Oportunidades del siglo XXI!

.

Los desafíos del Trabajo en los próximos años – Economía Personal

.

Los avances de la robotización y la destrucción de puestos de trabajo – Economía Personal

.


Vincúlese a nuestras Redes Sociales:

Google+      LinkedIn      YouTube      Facebook      Twitter


Cómo Ganar con el e-commerce

.

.

How The Economist is wrong about Artificial Intelligence

febrero 20, 2017

How The Economist is wrong about Artificial Intelligence

By . COO @ Bambu | Blogger and Speaker on Fintech | Health & Fitness.

trabajo tendencias

.

Recently The Economist published a special report called Lifelong learning is becoming an economic imperative, talking about how the workforce will need to adapt to increases in technology and automation across industries. Short version, resistance is futile. Long version, read on.

Yet as elegantly analyzed by Denis Sproten in his piece AI is rewriting John Keynes equation of employment, it really isn’t that simplistic. In the aftermath of the first industrial revolution, you saw manual laborers go from farms to factories. The cognitive requirements were higher, but most handled the transition in stride. Today, workers are transitioning from factories to offices, again increasing the cognitive requirements, but still most people cope. Can we level up forever, you ask..?

.

Nope. Nuh-uh. Technology is improving at an exponential rate, yet our genetics are improving through evolution at a linear rate, if at all. At some point, exponential leaves linear in the dust. We’re at that junction.

Automation combined with Artificial Intelligence means this time there is no new labor environment. We just don’t need you anymore, Pete. Automated software and hardware only need a few specialists to design and operate them. The cognitive requirements for such sophisticated engineering work are simply beyond reach for the majority of the global workforce. Re-education bootcamps and online courses aren’t going to help much.

There are two main forces at play:

A: The automation of work is increasing

.

Back in the early 2000’s, there was a lot of excitement around industrial automation. Replacing people pushing carts and packing boxes inside factories. Machine vision to instantly examine every single product for defects. Increased production. Fewer stoppages. Higher quality. Lower cost. No brainer, literally. Some workers moved into cushy back-office jobs, others didn’t. These aren’t intelligent machines either; they mechanically repeat a series of carefully (human) choreographed movements to do the job. Like a metallic and slightly terrifying marionette.

Now we’re already seeing the advent of Robotic Process Automation, which doing the same thing to software and data processing. Instead of having an army of offshore workers process Purchase Orders or process expense reports, you train a software robot how to do it. This will be a huge disruption for the massive offshoring industry in Asia.

The problem is exemplified in the recent news from Infosys releasing 9,000 employees from jobs that can be carried out by just 500 employees empowered with automated software.

This pace of human replacement becomes exponential with the advent of artificial intelligence. An intelligent robot or algorithm isn’t restricted to clearly repetitive manual tasks. Intelligence implies decision making, even creativity. It can learn by itself. You can replace entire business processes and divisions of human workers with artificial intelligence. We are the very beginning of this evolution of automation. Buckle up.

Elon Musk has estimated that up to 12-15% of the global workforce will be displaced through driverless cars. That could happen over the next two decades, even faster in developed markets. That isn’t a lot of time to prepare for this transition.

B: The complexity of work is increasing

.

Yes, there will still be jobs. The requirements will again take a notch up. Way bigger than last time. Right now the trend seems to be to get into software, but that may be short-sighted too. With visual design tools and A.I., you can certainly replace an entry-level programmer. Pretty soon A.I. will re-write its own code.

A good algo will create fewer bugs, consume less pizza, and work around the clock

Today’s flavor of the month, data scientists, are having a good time in the job market. Everything’s better with a sprinkle of #machinelearning, amirite? Will that be the case in 10 years, though? Machines are getting pretty good at finding patterns in data, too. Betting your career on a specialist skillset in such a time of disruption is a tough proposition. In my mind, I would rather bet on interpersonal skills, a wide personal network and a solid understanding of basic sciences.

Good generalist > great (obsolete) specialist

So in summary, most manual work will be replaced by physical robots, and most simple cognitive tasks will be replaced by software.

Sooo, what are we humans supposed to do then…?

#1: Power

Humans are great at concentrating power. I will take your marbles, because I can. We’ve already seen this in the development of the stock market. Historically speaking, profits are at an unsustainable level. It shouldn’t be possible. But it is, and technology, offshoring and now automation are the reason. Companies can afford to pay people less, often the biggest cost driver, while continuing to generate more revenue. Slowly they are also reducing headcount, but consistently creating bigger profits for shareholders. That’s how the system is designed to work. Sell more, pay less #bossmove

.

Today the 8 richest people on Earth own as much wealth as the poorest 50% of the world. If you thought there was already a power imbalance in the world, wait for the next 10 years as automation and artificial intelligence spread across industries. Wealth will increase, but it will fall into far fewer hands.

If knowledge is power today, intelligence is power tomorrow

The unfortunate truth about the current global economy is that it is driven by increased shareholder value. Not employee. Not society. Shareholder. Not a shareholder? Sucks to be you.

#2: Creativity

Humans will still own creation. Well, for a while. Maybe not that long, actually. Algorithms can already write code, design hardware, write songs, craft poems, and paint. Still, certain people will always strive to create, whether or not there’s a market for it. We’ll always have some form of art. We’ll play sports. Yet for most commercial purposes, the machines will take over. Their rate of improvement isn’t linear, it’s exponential. They simply aren’t limited by squishy things like DNA.

Relax Bob, go throw a ball or something. Leave the thinking to your buddy Hal.

Eventually, the machines will design better machines, and we won’t even need to worry about that. We won’t know how they work, but how could they explain it in terms we mortals could understand…?

#3: Leisure

What if we just, like… didn’t work. At all.

Think of a vacation that never ends. What would you do? Anything? Everything? It would be amazing initially. But is fun really enough for humans? Weren’t we great explorers once? Would Albert Einstein have settled for fun? Buzz Aldrin? Elon Musk? Would you?

(Un)Luckily, Virtual Reality has you covered. Try the virtual Mars experience, narrated by virtual Elon Musk. Download Zuck’s Virtual Startup and be the next Facebook! Take a break from serious work, and let’s become warlock elves in World of Warcraft VR3D. Why even walk at all, when you can fly on top of Mt. Everest in the comfort of your own sofa?

.

Think fat people on floating beds doing online shopping all day while sipping smoothies, like in Wall-E. Think people permanently engrossed in Virtual Reality, like in opium dens of old.

Then again, maybe we’ll all just take up fun, rewarding hobbies like yoga and scrapbooking. Well, virtual yoga if we’re feeling lazy that day. Or just watch the A.I. workout, really.

Don’t bite the metallic hand that feeds you

If we’re not working for money, then who’s paying for all this? Bill Gates and others have advocated taxing robots. Not even Wall-E can beat the tax man, hah! While a likely short-term solution, that clearly becomes entirely ambiguous and impossible to police in the case of software automation. Dagnabbit.

Elon Musk, among others, has proposed the concept of Universal Basic Income. Finland is already running trials. You get paid to live. No questions asked. Do whatever you want. Woohoo! Except maybe crime. And strictly no complaining about the machines.

This is the unfortunate end-state of this path. We’ll be relegated to pets, essentially, playing around harmlessly while the machines work tirelessly on our behalf. Hopefully more like a human-size hamster cage with cool slides and stuff, and less like the human battery farm of The Matrix.

Trump, the great socialist, to the rescue!

Ironically, it may be capitalist poster boy, Mr. Trump himself, who comes to the rescue. What we’re already seeing is a new trend of nationalism, focusing on internal affairs first. Companies are suddenly rewarded for creating jobs in the homeland. That obviously doesn’t sit well with global competitiveness. For most businesses, it would be more efficient to offshore and automate. Perhaps Trump’s populist approach is a way to slow down or counter this trend of automation by enforcing domestic employment… maybe he really IS that clever? Hmmm. Umm? Yeahhh.

The real issue that we’ll be facing is the true purpose of human progress. Is it still progress if it only applies to a chosen few?

Even if such issues were dealt with temporarily and locally, the networked global economy will create interesting new conflicts. Most U.S. companies have a majority of their business and operations outside the country. Think Apple, Google, Amazon, GE, J&J, Pfizer, Intel, etc.. Are they liable for outcomes of workforce automation in every country? Will Apple be liable for eventually replacing their planned India manufacturing staff with robots and algorithms?

Who decides that? It’s going to be a big mess.

What can you do, except get fat and wait for the matrix to switch on?

Become a shareholder. Be the guy that automates, not the guy that gets automated. Build passive income. Learn yoga. Start your own business. Enjoy life as we know it.

It ain’t gonna last.

Do you think this is pure fantasy, or are you already busy stocking beans and ammo to fight the robot uprising? Share and comment below.

Source: linkedin.com/pulse, Feb 20, 2017.

Más información:

Los nuevos Paradigmas del siglo XXI – Economía Personal

.

El Mundo está cambiando – Economía Personal

.

El Futuro del Trabajo en el Siglo XXI – Economía Personal

¡Descubra las Oportunidades del siglo XXI!

.

Los desafíos del Trabajo en los próximos años – Economía Personal

.

Los avances de la robotización y la destrucción de puestos de trabajo – Economía Personal


Vincúlese a nuestras Redes Sociales:

Google+      LinkedIn      YouTube      Facebook      Twitter


Cómo lograr su Libertad Financiera

.

.

inteligencia artificial

Fábrica china sustituye al 90% del personal con robots

febrero 6, 2017

En esta fábrica china han sustituido al 90% del personal con robots, y la producción ha crecido un 250%

El debate sobre el impacto de la robótica y la inteligencia artificial en nuestro futuro laboral es cada vez más frecuente, y casos como el que se ha producido en una factoría de la empresa china Changying Precision Technology Company deja claras las potenciales ventajas de esa automatización.

robotLos robots llevan muchos años reemplazando a trabajadores humanos en las cadenas de montaje, y en esta fábrica decidieron dar ese paso también: de los 650 empleados que tenía esa fábrica se ha pasado a solo 60, con el resto de labores realizadas por robots. El resultado ha sido aparentemente espectacular, con un aumento del 250% en la producción.

Video: Los avances de la robotización y la destrucción de puestos de trabajo

Los empleados perfectos son robots

De hecho, afirman los responsables de la fábrica, la plantilla humana se reducirá aún más para quedarse en tan solo 20 personas que se encargarán de gestionar y mantener esa maquinaria robótica que no sólo trabaja más; también lo hace mejor: el número de defectos se ha reducido de un 25% (parece un porcentaje muy elevado) a un 5%.

Robtos1

Los robots industriales son ya tradicionales en industrias como la automovilística, pero otras industrias están comenzando a dar también ese paso. Un estudio de 2013 de dos investigadores de la universidad de Oxford ya avisaron de que este tipo de automatización iría mucho más allá para imponerse en profesiones tan variadas como los cocineros (que no chefs), los relojetors, los dependientes, los analistas financieros o los técnicos dentales.

Video: El Futuro del Trabajo en el Siglo XXI

En nuestra entrevista con Federico Pistono este joven ingeniero ya revelaba que “el efecto de los robots en el empleo será la mayor revolución de la historia“, y las predicciones sobre ese impacto no paran de llegarnos desde todos los frentes, incluidas las entidades financieras. Los empresarios lo tienen claro: los robots no se cansan y no crean sindicatos, y si a eso unimos el aumento de la producción y la calidad, no parece que los seres humanos puedan competir en muchas áreas automatizables.

Fuente: zmescience.com, 03/02/17.


Vincúlese a nuestras Redes Sociales:

Google+      LinkedIn      YouTube      Facebook      Twitter


¿Estás cansado de tu Trabajo?

.

.

En 2030 la mitad de los empleados en Japón serán robots

febrero 4, 2017

En 2030 la mitad de los empleados en Japón serán robots

Desde la revolución industrial cada vez más puestos de trabajo pueden ser ocupados por máquinas, y ahora es más acentuado porque vivimos en la era de la automatización. Un estudio asegura que en 2030 la mitad de empleos en Japón estará ocupada por robots, debido a la población cada vez más vieja en el país.

El estudio, desarrollado por el Instituto de Investigación de Nomura (NRI – en japonés), y que se basa en un análisis que la Universidad Británica de Oxford aplicó en Reino Unido y los Estados Unidos, asegura que más del 49% de los empleos podrían ser reemplazados por sistemas computarizados para dentro de 10 o 20 años, debido al severo envejecimiento demográfico que afecta al país.

JapónY es que en Japón cada vez está más escasa la mano de obra, la población es cada vez más vieja y hoy en día más del 25% de la población japonesa tiene más de 65 años de edad, y este porcentaje no hará más que crecer durante las próximas décadas. Por ello, el estado está buscando una alternativa y solución a la futura (y actual) carencia de mano de obra, y la automatización parece ser la solución más viable.

Algunos de los miembros del estudio declararon a Vice:

“DESPUÉS DE APLICAR EL MISMO TIPO DE ANÁLISIS QUE EL PROFESOR MICHAEL OSBORNE DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DE OXFORD APLICÓ EN REINO UNIDO Y ESTADOS UNIDOS, HEMOS DESCUBIERTO QUE EL 49% DE LOS TRABAJOS PODRÁ SER OCUPADO POR MÁQUINAS AUTOMATIZADAS DENTRO DE ALGUNOS AÑOS, AUNQUE INFLUYEN ALGUNOS FACTORES SOCIALES QUE PODRÍAN AFECTAR ESTE NÚMERO. 

DE CUALQUIER FORMA, DEBIDO A LA ESCASEZ DE POBLACIÓN LABORAL EN JAPÓN, ESTAMOS BUSCANDO ALTERNATIVAS PARA PRESERVAR LA MANO DE OBRA DURANTE LAS PRÓXIMAS DÉCADAS, Y POR ELLO APUNTAMOS AL DESARROLLO DE LA ROBÓTICA Y LA INTELIGENCIA ARTIFICIAL.”

El estudio tomó se basó en examinar 601 puestos de trabajo distintos y en general deja claro que cualquier labor que no requiera un factor social tales como negociación, conversaciones, creatividad o conocimientos específicos, puede ser ocupado por un robot. Esto va desde guardias de seguridad y mesoneros a operadores de fábrica o conserjes, entre muchos otros.

Fuente: tecnovedosos.com

El Futuro del Trabajo en el Siglo XXI – Economía Personal

.

Los desafíos del Trabajo en los próximos años – Economía Personal

.

Los avances de la robotización y la destrucción de puestos de trabajo – Economía Personal


Vincúlese a nuestras Redes Sociales:

Google+      LinkedIn      YouTube      Facebook      Twitter


banner trabajo siglo xxi 01

.

.

¿Los robots nos dejarán sin trabajo?

octubre 11, 2016

El futuro del trabajo: ¿quién podrá protegernos de los robots?

Por Guillermo Cruces.

robotLa época que nos tocó vivir está marcada por un cambio tecnológico acelerado, vinculado a la creciente capacidad de las computadoras, a su ubicuidad y a su conectividad a redes globales. Además de los palpables cambios en la vida cotidiana, las nuevas tecnologías permiten una automatización de tareas que afecta directamente al mercado de trabajo. No se trata sólo de los robots en la línea de producción, o de la compra de pasajes online: la amenaza se cierne también sobre ocupaciones que creíamos seguras hace sólo unos años, como los servicios de traducción o el autotransporte de pasajeros.

Ver: El Desafío de los cambios del nuevo siglo

Los comentaristas reflejan la gran incertidumbre que generan estas tendencias. Exagerando levemente, encontramos por un lado a quienes predicen un desempleo tecnológico generalizado, el fin del trabajo tal como lo conocemos, e incluso un futuro distópico de desigualdad y miseria extrema si no tomamos cartas en el asunto. Por otro lado, los panglossianos, optimistas sempiternos, consideran que este es sólo un escalón más del crecimiento de la productividad en la historia de la humanidad, que nos ha llevado a estándares de vida inimaginables en el pasado.

Sólo el tiempo dirá quiénes tienen razón, pero la historia puede guiar en este debate con evidencia. Vivimos lo que hoy parece una transformación excepcional, pero hace milenios que enfrentamos revoluciones tecnológicas que desplazan al trabajo y afectan su productividad: desde la rueda y el arado a la imprenta, la máquina de vapor y el microprocesador. ¿Será esta vez diferente? Los últimos milenios nos demuestran que eventualmente nos reconvertimos y nos adaptamos como trabajadores a las nuevas realidades tecnológicas, y que las ganancias de productividad incrementan los niveles de vida de nuestras sociedades.

La teoría económica también aporta argumentos para la discusión. Las predicciones más pesimistas se basan en visiones algo vetustas del mercado de trabajo, considerado como un juego de suma cero: un robot desplaza a un trabajador y simplemente se pierde un puesto. La teoría económica evolucionó y explica interdependencias más complejas. En la Revolución industrial, la diligencia fue reemplazada por el tren, pero surgieron nuevas profesiones: maquinistas, ingenieros, administrativos? David Autor y Daron Acemoglu, del MIT, teorizan sobre estos fenómenos, y señalan que los comentaristas exageran la sustitución de máquinas por humanos e ignoran «las fuertes complementariedades entre automatización y trabajo que aumentan la productividad, los ingresos y la demanda de trabajo».

De todos modos, los cambios pueden ser traumáticos y pueden producir perdedores en la transición. En los países desarrollados, en las últimas décadas se observa un proceso de polarización del empleo, con un mayor crecimiento en los segmentos de baja y alta calificación (menos automatizables y complementarios a la tecnología, respectivamente), y un retroceso de los puestos medios. Estos cambios están directamente relacionados con el cambio tecnológico.

Ver: Los avances de la robotización y la destrucción de puestos de trabajo

Finalmente, este debate se trasladó al rol de las políticas públicas. Es fundamental minimizar los costos de la transición y compensar a quienes se ven perjudicados. Jason Furman, jefe de asesores económicos de Obama, señaló recientemente la necesidad de impulsar políticas innovadoras, como los seguros de salarios y extensiones al seguro de desempleo. Y aunque exagerada en el diagnóstico, la predicción del desempleo tecnológico masivo introdujo en el centro de la discusión pública una nueva ola de propuestas de ingreso básico universal.

robot jetsonsPero además de las compensaciones, debemos concentrarnos en cómo aprovechar las oportunidades que estos cambios plantean. Más que lamentar un ominoso e inexorable futuro o desarrollar una resistencia que, en el largo plazo, será fútil (los luditas no lograron detener la Revolución industrial), la energía será mejor invertida en pensar e implementar una transformación productiva inclusiva.

—El autor es economista e investigador del Cedlas (FCE-UNLP).

Fuente: La Nación, 09/10/16.



Promocione su negocio con el marketing digital

.

.

China apuesta a los robots

agosto 23, 2016

China recurre a los robots para mantener su ventaja manufacturera

Por Robbie Whelan en Estocolmo y Esther Fung en Suzhou, China.
Una fábrica de Kuka en Augsburgo, Alemania.
Una fábrica de Kuka en Augsburgo, Alemania. 

Una fábrica cerca de Shanghai confía en que una nueva clase de trabajadores le ayude a mantener su ventaja competitiva en el ensamblaje de dispositivos electrónicos: unos pequeños robots diseñados en Alemania.

robot industrialYugen Gao, presidente de la junta de Suzhou Victory Precision Manufacture Co., dice que los días en los que la empresa extraía su fortaleza de empleados baratos y dedicados han quedado atrás.

“Hemos estado perdiendo esa ventaja en los últimos tres años”, dice Gao en su oficina con vista a hileras de edificios donde un batallón de robots arma teclados de computadoras. “Es uno de los efectos de la política de hijo único”.

El apetito de China por los robots industriales hechos en Europa aumenta rápidamente a medida que un alza de los salarios, una fuerza laboral que se encoge y cambios culturales llevan a más empresas chinas hacia la automatización. Los tipos de robots favorecidos por los fabricantes chinos también están cambiando, conforme la automatización se expande de industrias pesadas como la fabricación de autos hacia sectores que requieren robots más precisos y flexibles capaces de manejar y ensamblar productos más pequeños, incluyendo electrónicos de consumo y ropa.

.

Lo que está en juego es el predominio de China en el sector manufacturero.

“China está diciendo: ‘Tenemos que robotizar nuestra industria para mantenerla’”, señala Stefan Lampa, presidente de la junta de la división de robótica de Kuka AG , empresa de automatización alemana y proveedora de Suzhou Victory.

La carrera por comprar robots se produce en parte porque la población de trabajadores de entre 15 y 59 años de China empieza a reducirse, lo que obliga a las empresas manufactureras a recurrir a la automatización. Naciones Unidas estima que el número de trabajadores en China llegó a su nivel máximo en 2010, de más de 900 millones, y caerá a menos de 800 millones para 2050.

Sumado a ello, el costo laboral promedio por hora —definido como salario más prestaciones— de US$14,60 en el bastión manufacturero en la costa se ha más que duplicado como porcentaje de los salarios manufactureros en Estados Unidos, de casi 30% en 2000 a 64% en 2015, según Boston Consulting Group. Esta evolución torna al país menos competitivo como destino para los fabricantes.

En 2013, China se convirtió en el mayor mercado para robots industriales, sobrepasando a toda Europa Occidental, según la Federación Internacional de Robótica. En 2015, las fábricas chinas compraron cerca de 67.000 robots, casi un cuarto de las ventas globales, y se proyecta que la demanda se más que duplique para 2018, a 150.000 unidades al año.

Las compañías chinas también invierten en tecnología industrial, con la mira puesta en la fabricación de sus propios robots. En mayo, Midea Group Co., fabricante de electrodomésticos chino, hizo una oferta de compra por Kuka de más de US$5.000 millones y ahora posee casi 86% del constructor de robots. Algunos políticos alemanes criticaron el acuerdo, diciendo que Kuka es un activo estratégico que debió permanecer en manos alemanas o europeas.

En una conferencia de investigación de robótica llevada a cabo en mayo en Estocolmo, compañías como Kuka y la suiza ABB Ltd. mostraron robots ligeros con brazos ágiles capaces de manipular objetos tan pequeños como tapas de botellas.

El año pasado, ABB presentó una versión de dos brazos de su robot YuMi, un modelo liviano diseñado específicamente para el mercado chino. El robot puede ensamblar los componentes electrónicos del tablero de un auto, relojes de pulsera y gafas.

Robots en una fábrica de Kuka en Shanghai
Robots en una fábrica de Kuka en Shanghai. 

YuMi, que se fabrica tanto en una planta de Suecia como en una instalación hermana que abrió hace una década en Shanghai, fue diseñado como un robot de “colaboración”, es decir que es pequeño y lo suficientemente seguro como para compartir la línea de ensamblaje con humanos, sin requerir una caja protectora como muchos grandes robots industriales.

En los últimos cinco años, China se ha convertido en el mayor mercado de clientes de robótica para ABB, de acuerdo con Steven Wyatt, director de marketing y ventas de la empresa de Zúrich.

Wyatt señala que China comenzó a adoptar la automatización en masa en respuesta a las preocupaciones sobre la calidad de los productos manufacturados en el país. Ahora, sin embargo, las fábricas chinas, incluidas aquellas que hacen productos de consumo, compran robots para llenar las vacantes que de otra manera seguirían vacantes debido a las altas tasas de rotación de empleados.

“Por difícil que sea de creer, a pesar de tener 1.300 millones de habitantes, China no encuentra suficiente gente para cubrir el trabajo que generan sus fábricas”, dice Wyatt.

Otro factor son los costos. Las tecnologías de robótica que alguna vez fueron increíblemente costosas son ahora lo suficientemente económicas como para ser viables en las fábricas chinas.

OptoForce Ltd., de Budapest, fabrica sensores de 2.500 euros (US$2.796) que pueden ser incorporados a los brazos de los robots y ser usados para pulir partes metálicas que van dentro de las cajas de cambio de los autos y otros productos. Su director de ventas, Szabi Fekete, cuenta que en los últimos años esos sensores se han vuelto considerablemente más baratos de producir.

“Hace 10 años, cuando un sensor de fuerza costaba 20.000 euros, nadie quería automatizar el pulido, porque era más barato contratar a 100 trabajadores”, explica Fekete.

Suzhou Victory, que ensambla computadoras portátiles para Dell Inc. y Lenovo Group Ltd. y relojes inteligentes para Fitbit Inc., comenzó a aumentar su inversión en robots hace dos años, impulsado por la reducción de los ciclos de productos, el aumento de los salarios y la alta rotación de los trabajadores, sobre todo después de las vacaciones anuales alrededor del Año Nuevo Lunar. Este año, el fabricante firmó un acuerdo para comprar 160 robots de brazo articulado hechos por Kuka.

“Tenemos que considerar la inversión en robots para que la empresa pueda sobrevivir por más tiempo”, sostiene Gao.

Fuente: The Wall Street Journal, 16/08/16.

sea su propio jefe

.

.

Adiós al Cajero del banco

agosto 10, 2016

Adiós al cajero del banco: los bots son el futuro de las finanzas

Programadores nacionales, entre ellos alumnos universitarios, han desarrollado una serie de “bot” que responden consultas y manejan quejan de los clientes de los bancos. Están basados en la inteligencia artificial y el Machine Learning y son el futuro de la banca y los servicios financieros.

Por Sebastián De Toma.

Adiós al cajero del banco: los bots son el futuro de las finanzas

.

Dos desarrollos nacionales bien recientes abren el interrogante presentado en el título: se trata de bots o chatbots, es decir, un software programado para responderle a humanos a través del uso de la inteligencia artificial y el Machine Learning que ultimamente está en boca de todos.

robotsEn la Argentina, hay varios emprendimientos locales que intentan aprovechar las posibilidades que ofrecen estos desarrollos en favor de la industria financiera. Por un lado, está el bot desarrollado por tres alumnos del Instituto Tecnológico de Buenos Aires (ITBA) al que denominaron “Alicia” con el que ganaron el Hackatón realizado por el Banco Galicia en el mes de mayo. Por el otro, se encuentra el bot que programaron ingenieros de Axxon Consulting con el que buscan ayudar a que bancos y compañías de servicios financieros mejoren sus interacciones con los clientes.

“Alicia” es una solución digital para los clientes “semibancarizados” de los bancos, que interpreta el pedido del cliente y lo transforma en instrucciones para el sistema, de forma tal que los usuarios interactúen con el banco mediante un chat, como si lo estuvieran haciendo con una persona. “Nicolás, Luciano y Ramiro cursan Ingeniería Informática, carrera que desarrolla el perfil emprendedor y la capacidad de realizar la transformación eficiente de la información y de gerenciar la innovación tecnológica para lograrlo”,  destaca Silvia Gómez, directora de la carrera Ingeniería informática del ITBA, que están cursando actualmente los ganadores: Nicolás Clozza, Luciano Mosquera y Ramiro Olivera Fedi.

Olivera Fedi, en diálogo con Infotechnology.com, cuenta que decidieron “implementar un sistema de inteligencia artificial que permita al Banco interactuar con el cliente como si fuera una conversación por mensaje de texto”. Respecto a los aspectos técnicos, detalla que utilizaron Community Service de Microsoft para el self-checking; y la “la fuerza de inteligencia artificial es de IBM”, una serie de herramientas basadas en la supercomputadora Watson que “sirve para interpretar texto” a través del Machine Learning. “Hay magia nuestra”, agrega con una sonrisa, “pero la fuerza está ahí”. Además, los jóvenes estudiantes (de entre 21 y 24 años), que tienen planes de seguir desarrollando la herramienta por fuera del Galicia, participaron en otros Hakatones como el de Eklos by AB InBev.

Desde Axxon Consulting, por su parte, crearon un bot que le permite a bancos y empresas de servicios financieros atender una queja de un cliente vía Whatsapp (por ejemplo): contesta preguntas sencillas como el saldo o la ubicación de una sucursal. Si no puede resolver el asunto, lo escala y registra un incidente de servicio en el CRM del Banco. “Esto permite que la empresa llegue a los canales y medios donde está su cliente, pero sin dejar de trackear el historial de interacciones y permitiendo incluso automatizarlo”, explica Francisco Nelson, Director de CRM de la compañía desarrolladora a Infotechnology.com.

En relación con la tecnología, el bot está conectado a las plataformas de inteligencia artificial de Microsoft y a medida que va contestando consultas e interactuando, más aprende. Además, utiliza otra tecnología, el Language Understanding Intelligent Service, que “interpreta lo que vas diciendo y en base a eso va disparando acciones”, específica Nelson. Es un sistema con el que ya están trabajando para implementar en un importante banco de capitales nacionales.

“Hay que tener cuidado en no abusar, es más una herramienta inbound que outbound: vos lo ponés ahí y está 24 horas todo el día y cuando el cliente quiere, se contacta.  Si lográs eso, tenés un canal espectacular para mejorar la satisfacción de los clientes”, desarrolla para luego advertir: “Si el cliente viene y consulta, el bot le responde, pero no que el bot sea un loro que esté mandando mensajes: hay que manejarlo con cuidado pero es un canal muy interesante.”

Fuente: infotechnology.com, 10/08/16.

Más información:

Los hoteles experimentan con robots

Un local comercial atendido por robots

banner trabajo siglo xxi 01

.

China lidera la robotización

agosto 7, 2016

China lidera la nueva revolución

Por Jorge Castro.

La robotización en China comenzó. Tiene 36 robots cada 10.000 obreros, mientras que Alemania tiene 292 y Corea del Sur, 478.

chinaChina encabeza la nueva revolución industrial en la “Internet de las Cosas” (IoT), conexión que realizan chips inteligentes en un sistema cibernético integrado que vincula sociedad, naturaleza e individuos a escala global. El mercado chino de IoT ascendió a US$193.000 millones en 2015, y treparía a US$361.000 millones en 2020. Abarca líneas aéreas, empresas de telecomunicaciones y proveedoras de equipos.

Las conexiones inteligentes alcanzaron a 80 millones en 2015 y superarían 360 millones en 5 años. Este desarrollo explosivo del sistema cibernético integrado agregaría al PBI chino –sólo en la industria manufacturera– US$736.000 millones en 2030. En EE.UU., es 40 millones en 2015 y serán 150 millones en 2020.

La IoT entró en una fase tecnológicamente superior. Surgieron 4 protocolos globales –Siemens, GE, China Móvil, Huawei– que establecen los softwares para conectar automáticamente la industria del mundo a través de la “nube” (cloud computing), la nueva revolución tecnológica más allá de Internet.

Las áreas cruciales de la nueva revolución industrial son “Internet de las Cosas” y robotización. Y China encabeza las dos. Ha comprado más robots industriales por año que cualquier otra de las grandes potencias manufactureras (Alemania, Japón, Corea del Sur) desde 2013. El año pasado adquirió 66.000 robots (en todo el mundo se vendieron 240.000), y superaría este año a Japón como el mayor operador mundial de robots industriales. Esto sucede cuando el costo de los robots disminuye 20% por año y sus capacidades mejoran 5% anual.

La robotización en China recién ha comenzado. Dispone de 36 robots cada 10.000 trabajadores industriales, en tanto Alemania tiene 292; Japón, 314 y Corea del Sur, 478. Al ritmo actual, que se triplica por año, lograría el nivel surcoreano en 2030.

El gobierno chino prevé que más de 80% de las 340.000 fábricas del cinturón manufacturero costero que se despliega desde Shenzen/Hong Kong a Shanghai se volcaran a la robotización en los próximos 15 años.

China ha desatado una política deliberada de robotización de su industria, incentivada, financiada y liderada por la conducción política. Motiva esta decisión estratégica el rostro irreductible de la necesidad económica. La fuerza de trabajo china se reduce en términos absolutos y tendría 40 millones de operarios menos en 2030.

Al mismo tiempo, el ingreso per cápita crece por encima del PBI nominal (8% anual/6,5% por año en 2015). Por eso, los salarios reales han crecido 20% anual a partir de 2009. Mao advirtió que la única forma de conducir una tendencia es acelerarla.

La República Popular solo puede crecer a partir de la innovación desde 2009, cuando completó la convergencia estructural (ingreso per cápita/alza de la productividad) con EE.UU. De ahí que el liderazgo chino en la nueva revolución industrial tenga hasta ahora un significado cuantitativo, no cualitativo. Lo cualitativo en robótica es la fabricación de nuevos equipos, tecnológicamente más avanzados, no ser la mayor compradora.

Los fabricantes de robots chinos con tecnología propia se han especializado en equipos más baratos (20%/30% inferiores en precio a los alemanes y japoneses) y adecuados a las exigencias locales. Falta la tecnología de punta, aún en manos de la alemana ABD y la japonesa Kuka; y el liderazgo auténticamente innovador de la nueva revolución industrial se decide en la frontera tecnológica.

El desarrollo capitalista es desigual y combinado, y las diferencias de productividad marcan los saltos cualitativos que lo caracterizan. La nueva revolución industrial en China se funda en un movimiento masivo de innovación que se realiza a través del comercio por Internet. Más de 40 millones de nuevos emprendedores han surgido a partir de 2009, y crecen 4/5 millones por año. La innovación en China es un movimiento de masas, no un monopolio de los laboratorios, provocada por una cultura de creatividad.

China puede ocupar la frontera de la nueva revolución industrial en 5/10 años.

Fuente: Clarín, 07/08/16.

Más información:

Diez claves sobre el Trabajo del Futuro

El Futuro del Trabajo en el Siglo XXI

Las Oportunidades que brinda internet

banner trabajo siglo xxi 01

.

.

El impacto del progreso tecnológico en la Economía global

mayo 24, 2016

Revolución en el mundo avanzado

Por Jorge Castro.

La cuestión central hoy no es el ritmo de la innovación, sino la economía política del progreso tecnológico. El fenómeno Trump.

La regla en el capitalismo avanzado en los últimos 15 años ha sido que el capital sustituye al trabajo como forma de incrementar la productividad, y en el camino se ha apoderado del doble de las ganancias que la fuerza laboral. La compensación de la fuerza de trabajo –fondo salarial– creció 1% anual en EE.UU. desde 1980, mientras que la productividad aumentó 2% anual en ese período.

robotsEn el contexto mundial, esta regla ha sido acompañada por un hecho demográfico desatado por un acontecimiento geopolítico. Al unificarse el sistema por el colapso de la Unión Soviética (1991), la fuerza de trabajo mundial se duplicó en 3 años (pasó de 1.500 millones de trabajadores a 3.500 millones); y el porcentaje del capital en la relación capital-trabajo se multiplicó por 2, en tanto cayó a la mitad el del segundo, con ganancias capitalistas que aumentaron 75% entre 1991 y 1995.

La virtual hegemonía del capital sobre el trabajo ha adquirido un carácter paroxístico en EE. UU. en los últimos 6 años. Esto coincidió con el retraso del capital humano en relación con las exigencias de la revolución tecnológica (4 millones de empleos ofrecidos no son ocupados por carecer de personal con calificaciones suficientes).

La productividad en el capitalismo no proviene del capital sino del trabajo. Mientras tanto, la relevancia del capital es cada vez menor, porque los bienes de capital pueden ahora ser codificados y reproducidos instantáneamente y en forma global a través de la digitalización.

El capital físico tiende a desaparecer, y su lugar lo ocupa el capital intelectual; y lo mismo sucede con la fuerza de trabajo, que se desmaterializa y se convierte en “inteligencia colectiva”.

El capitalismo como sistema deja de ser capitalista. La consecuencia es que las ganancias de productividad por trabajador ocupado (plusvalía relativa) son cada vez mayores. Las de Google son 12 veces superiores a las de General Motors.

Por eso la cuestión fundamental hoy no es el ritmo de la innovación tecnológica, que se exacerbó, sino la economía política del progreso tecnológico, el tema de la gobernabilidad de la revolución digital (fenómeno Trump en EE.UU.).

El costo de la computación cayó 64% anual desde la década del 80, y su derrumbe se aceleró en los últimos 15 años: 75%/80% anual. McKinsey estima que los robots instalados globalmente aumentarán en 10 millones en los próximos 10 años (pasan de 15 a 25 millones), con un alza de 30% anual; y 75% de ese auge ocurrirá en China.

Ver: Los hoteles experimentan con robots

Los robots suplantarían a 3,8 millones de trabajadores chinos en la próxima década; y las provincias del Sur (Guandong en primer lugar) invertirán US$8.000 millones por año en equipos robóticos entre 2015 y 2017.

Ver: ¿Su Puesto de Trabajo en riesgo?

El costo de la fuerza de trabajo industrial en el mundo es hoy de US$6 billones por año; y la robotización en marcha implica un recorte de US$1,2 billones anuales entre 2015 y 2025.

Lo que importa no es la densidad de la robotización (número de equipos x 10.000 trabajadores), sino la celeridad de su incorporación, porque el alza de la productividad depende de la segunda, no de la primera. China tiene 36 robots por cada 10.000 trabajadores, y Corea del Sur 478; mientras que Alemania dispone de 292 y Japón de 314, pero la República Popular incorpora por año dos veces más equipos automatizados que todos ellos sumados.

Hay que prever una serie sucesiva de revoluciones políticas y sociales en el mundo avanzado en los próximos 10 años, ante la aceleración del mayor factor disruptivo de la época, que es la revolución tecnológica.

Fuente: Clarín, 15/05/16.

Twitter de Jorge Castro: https://twitter.com/ipejorgecastro

banner Jorge Castro 01

« Página anteriorPágina siguiente »